The plant based nurse

My family's excellent adventure to better health!


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Why is Nutrition Ignored in Medicine?

Free program at TCMC Wed November 30th at 5:30 p.m. “Why is Nutrition Ignored in Medicine?” by T. Colin Campbell. This is part of the Preventive Medicine Lecture Series at The Commonwealth Medical College. There will be continuing Education Credit for medical professionals, too! Open to the public and all are welcome.

For decades, Dr. T. Colin Campbell has been at the forefront of nutrition education and research. Dr. Campbell’s expertise and scientific interests encompass relationships between diet and diseases, particularly the causation of cancer. His legacy, the China Project, is one  of the most comprehensive studies of health and nutrition ever conducted. The New York Times has recognized the study as the “Grand Prix of epidemiology.”

For out of towners, Scranton is about two hours away from Philadelphia and NYC.

CALL OR GO TO THE WEBSITE ON THE FLYER BELOW TO REGISTER. YOU WON’T WANT TO MISS THIS GREAT PROGRAM!

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Soup’s on! Scott Yum Soup, that is…

img_20161106_202405My husband was craving noodle soup this week and I finally decided to make it for him. Two bowls later, I’m not sure if I really made it for him, or for myself!
One of my favorite soups is the Vegetarian Tom Yum soup at our favorite local Thai restaurant but I have not been able to recreate it. I prefer to make soup at home when I can since the restaurant versions are usually higher in sodium and it’s fun to experiment and have a new soup every time I make it.
The first time I attempted a Thai soup, I used a recipe that a friend shared with me but it didn’t have quite the zing we were looking for. Finally, my husband Scott said he thought some fresh lime juice would give it that missing flavor we were craving. I don’t expect this will be the same soup the next time I make it, and I hope that if you make it, you will play with it and make it your own. You can use whatever veggies you like or have in your fridge, add and subtract ingredients as you like and share it with your friends and family!
Here is my version of Tom Yum Soup which I call “Scott Yum Soup” named for my husband Scott. I finally looked up Tom Yum soup and it appears I am missing lemongrass, so maybe next time!
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Ingredients:
64 oz veggie broth
3-4 chopped green onions, white and green parts
1 or 2 thinly sliced carrots
4-5 sliced mushrooms (use whatever variety you prefer)
2-3 tablespoons of fresh ginger, peeled and grated with a ceramic grater or minced in a mini chopper
1-2 cups chopped baby bok choy
1 cup chopped cilantro
1 teaspoon low sodium soy sauce or Braggs Liquid Aminos
1 teaspoon miso
3-4 oz rice noodles or brown rice noodles
Juice and zest of 1 lime
1 teaspoon Sambal Oelek
Optional: Cubed tofu (extra firm) I like to use an 8 oz pkg of already cubed tofu tofu to make the job quicker. You can use the tofu plain, but I like to drain it and add a splash of low sodium soy sauce, sprinkle the tofu with Chinese Five Spice and bake it on parchment paper for about 20 min at 450 degrees in my toaster oven.
Directions:
1. Pour the veggie broth into a nice big pot on medium heat
2. Add the green onions, carrots, mushrooms, fresh ginger, bok choy, soy sauce and miso and  bring to a gentle boil and cook for 5-10 minutes.
3. Turn the burner off, then add the tofu and the noodles. The rice vermicelli I use just needs to sit in the hot broth for about 2 min. Be sure to follow the directions for whatever kind of noodles you use.
4. Add fresh cilantro to taste, reserve some for garnish at the table
5. Add the sambal oelek, use less if you don’t like spice and more if you love it!
6. Add the lime juice and zest and serve!
7. Serve with extra Sambal Oelek , cilantro, and fresh lime wedges or slices if desired.
A second bowl? I think I will!
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Always remember to– Have fun with your food and enjoy!
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A Taste of Fall: Three Bean Chili with Roasted Butternut Squash

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I have been feeling like I needed a new challenge, so I decided to jump in and take the Rouxbe cooking school professional plant-based certification course. I will be very busy for the next six months learning more about plant-based nutrition, knife skills, cooking techniques, and new recipes.

Our first cooking assignment in class was to make our go to dish, one with which we are familiar and is in our regular meal rotation. I have always loved chili and now that we are plant-based, chili is almost an obsession for me. I not only eat it year round, but I always make a big pot and can eat it daily until it’s gone when most would put the leftovers in the freezer.

In the fall, I love all of the sweet, colorful squash that is available in the local farmers markets and in the grocery stores. They are loaded with flavor, visual interest, and nutrients, such as Vitamin A and beta carotene. One cup of cooked squash has 457% of the recommended daily allowance  of Vitamin A, and is a good source of fiber, potassium, and magnesium. One of my favorite squashes is butternut. I love it in chili as it adds a mild sweetness to contrast the spice of the chili powder, jalapeno peppers, and chipotle seasoning. Did you know that the butternut squash is a member of the cucurbitaceae family, which includes gourds and melons most likely originated in Mexico? Once called “the apple of God,” the butternut squash was prized by American Indians, who believed its seeds increased fertility. Australians refer to it as “butternut pumpkin”  and it can be substituted in most recipes that call for pumpkin. Thanks to WebMD for these fun facts!

Hope you love chili as much as we do and let me know if you enjoy this recipe:

Three Bean Chili with Roasted Butternut Squash

Ingredients:

1 large or 2 small diced onions

1 large or 2 small diced jalapeno peppers

1 large clove of garlic, minced or 3 small cloves

3-4 tablespoons of chili powder

1 teaspoon of ground red chipotle

1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper

1 – 15 oz can of kidney beans, low sodium or no added salt

1 – 15 oz can of pinto beans, low sodium or no added salt, rinsed and drained

1- 15 oz can of black beans, low sodium or no added salt, rinsed and drained

1- 28 oz can low sodium crushed tomatoes

1- 15 oz can diced, fire roasted tomatoes, low sodium

1 small butternut squash, peeled and cubed (grocery stores often sell cubed squash in the produce section if you need a time saving shortcut)

About 1/2 -1 c. chopped fresh cilantro

Juice of 1/2- 1 lime

About 1/3 cup of vegetable broth for sautéing your veggies. You can use water if you don’t have broth.

Optional: Your favorite guacamole recipe to complement your chili or serve on the side with some baked oil free tortilla chips. Our favorite is Alton Brown’s Homemade Guacamole.  We make it whenever we have rice and beans or chili. It is mouth watering good!

20161030_174930.jpg Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

  1. Spread the butternut squash out on a baking tray covered with parchment paper or a silicone mat and bake for about 30 minutes until fork tender and lightly browned.
  2. While the squash is baking, sauté the onion and jalapeno pepper on medium high until soft, add veggie broth or water as needed to prevent sticking, add the garlic and sauté 1-2 minutes.
  3. Add the chili powder, chipotle, and cayenne and stir.
  4. Add the crushed tomatoes, fire roasted tomatoes, and kidney, pinto, and black beans.
  5. Turn the heat down to low and let your chili simmer.
  6. When your squash has finished baking, add it to the chili, along with the fresh lime juice.
  7. You can add cilantro to your chili to taste, or if you have friends or family who can’t eat cilantro because it tastes like soap to them, just put it on the table so folks can add it as desired.
  8. Top with guacamole or tofu sour cream as desired.

Chili is so versatile. It is wonderful over rice, baked white or sweet potatoes, pasta, or even polenta. So, get your chili on and have fun with it! Make your chili your own with your own flavors and spice preferences.

And, as always…Have fun with your food and enjoy!

 

 

 

 


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Cheap-Ass Fake-Ass Veggie Biryani from my plant-based husband

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Yes, he can cook! My husband made me a delicious veggie biryani tonight. He calls it Cheapass Fakeass Veggie Biryani. Cheapass because it is a very inexpensive and fakeass because it might not pass the test of authenticity in an Indian kitchen. However, I loved it and wanted to share it with you because it’s a no fuss dish that is delicious and can be made in minutes. Here’s his recipe!

Cheap-Ass Fake-Ass Biryani   -by G. Scott Hayes

Well, we’ll see how this goes. I didn’t keep track of my amounts. I should’ve known Jean would want to blog this.
Start with an onion, 2 cloves of garlic, and 1 1/2 cups of raw Basmati rice.
Dice the onion, mince the garlic and sauté, adding several shakes of your favorite curry powder–we like Penzey’s.

Add a couple extra shakes of fenugreek if you have it. That’s the one spice that I think makes curry taste like curry. Add the raw rice and sauté with the onion, garlic, and spices,

adding water and cooking according to the package directions.
While the rice is cooking steam some vegetables, frozen or fresh, in vegetable broth. I used
frozen Potatoes O’Brien (with onions and peppers!) 1 carrot (peeled and sliced), about 1 cup frozen broccoli, 1 c. frozen cauliflower, 1/2 c. frozen peas, and 1/4 c. of frozen corn.
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Throw in a few raisins and cashews while you’re at it. I wish I had thought of that when I
was making it. Sprinkle in some more curry powder with the vegetables.
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When the rice and vegetables are done, combine them in a big fancy bowl so Jean can take
pictures.
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You can adjust the spices at the table if you want extra kick. We added some Sriracha sauce and I sprinkled some extra curry powder on my dish.
Thanks to my plant-based husband for a great dinner and for sharing his recipe!
Remember to have fun with your food and enjoy!


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What’s in the fridge stir “fry” with baked sesame tofu

 

Last evening I was in the mood for a dish with tofu and I had time to drain it, marinate it, and chop the veggies for a stir “fry” which is one of my husband’s favorite things. I also had a bowl of fresh broccoli and broccoli greens that I had just cut from my garden. The greenhouse where I bought the broccoli plants told me that if I’m lucky, I may still be harvesting broccoli into January!

20161015_143633The next step was to drain the tofu. I always use extra firm tofu for this dish and after I drain off the water, I slice it in 1/2 lengthwise, lay it in a colander, cover it with paper towels, put my family flat iron on top and ignore it for the afternoon. When I’m in a hurry I only drain it for 30-60 min, but it absorbs the marinade so much better when it’s well drained and has so much more flavor.

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While the tofu is draining, I make the marinade:

1/2 c. low sodium veggie broth

1 TBS lower sodium soy sauce or Bragg’s liquid aminos

1 huge clove of garlic or 2-3 average sized cloves, minced

A 3 inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and minced in a mini chopper or grated with a ceramic grater

1 tsp of sambal oelek or Sriracha sauce if you like some heat

Mix all the ingredients together in a small bowl, cut the tofu into bite sized cubes and place into a shallow dish. Sprinkle Chinese Five Spice over the tofu and then pour the marinade over the tofu. Let the tofu marinate for at least 30 minutes.

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While the tofu is marinating, get your other ingredients lined up:

3 carrots, peeled and sliced thinly

1 onion, sliced thinly or several green onions, chopped (white and green parts)

1 red pepper, chopped

½-1 jalapeno pepper, chopped finely

1 lime, cut into 6 wedges

1-2 TBS of fresh Thai basil or cilantro, chopped

Approximately 2-3 cups or more of broccoli, chopped along with the leaves if available.

If no broccoli leaves/greens available, add some chopped cabbage or bok choy

12-16 oz whole grain rice vermicelli or your favorite whole grain pasta (or cooked brown rice, approximately 3 cups)

1 TBS cornstarch mixed with 2-3 TBS water

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Preheat the oven or toaster oven to 450 degrees. If you don’t have the veggies in the ingredient list, use the ones you have in your fridge or garden! The possibilities are endless.

Place the tofu cubes on a baking tray lined with parchment paper or a silicone mat, sprinkle with sesame seeds, and bake for 30-40 min until they are nice and brown. You can turn them if you like, but I prefer to leave them alone. Save the marinade!

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Using a slotted spoon, remove the remaining ginger and garlic from the marinade and set aside. Add ½ c. veggie broth to reserved marinade.

While the tofu is baking, prepare your rice or pasta and keep warm.

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When the tofu is almost done, heat up your wok or a very large skillet.

Add a couple of TBS of veggie broth or water to your pan and when it is hot, and the onions, peppers, garlic, ginger, and cook for a couple of min at high heat until the veggies begin to soften.

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Add the carrots, broccoli, and greens and cook for a couple of minutes until they are done to your liking. Add more veggie broth as needed to keep the veggies from sticking and help them to steam.

When the veggies are done, move them to the sides of your wok or pan, and pour the reserved marinade into the center of the wok. Heat the marinade through and add the cornstarch that you mixed with water and let the broth thicken. Mix the sauce and veggies together. Add the Thai basil or cilantro.

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Place the rice or pasta in a large serving bowl, add the veggies, and top with the tofu.

Enjoy!

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Tips:

  1. Serve with extra chopped Thai basil or cilantro and the lime wedges. The fresh lime adds a wonderful brightness at the table.
  2. Add extra Sriracha sauce or sambal oelek at the table as desired for extra kick!
  3. If you don’t have heart disease, you can add a couple of tablespoons of peanut butter to the reserved marinade.
  4. Remember this is your dish. Feel free to make changes and substitutions to accommodate your preferences AND what you have in your fridge and your cupboard!
  5. To save time, use frozen veggies or chopped veggies from the produce section of the grocery store.

I hope you will love the Thai basil as much as we do. It’s aromatic, beautiful, and adds wonderful flavor to stir fry dishes. It also grows with little tending or care in the garden.

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Remember to have fun with your food and enjoy!

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Delaware and Hudson…more than a meal!

How often do you have a meal that makes you fall in love with the chef? Words cannot adequately describe the experience we had last evening thanks to Chef Patti Jackson at Delaware and Hudson  in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn NY.

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Chef Patti grew up in Clarks Summit, PA, the community where we also grew up, raised our children, and still reside. We were so excited when we heard she was opening her own restaurant in NY and we finally had a chance to go and sample her creations. Patti’s grandfather worked for the Delaware and Hudson railway and her American cuisine is named for the canal system, gravity railroad, coal line and passenger trains that served the Northeast in the 19th and early 20th centuries. I love the history behind the venue and the vision that went into planning not only the menu but the warm atmosphere in the 35 seat tavern and the 38 seat restaurant.

The menu at Delaware and Hudson changes weekly, reflecting the availability of local ingredients from farms and markets in the surrounding area and you can read about the farms that supply the restaurant on its website.

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My husband, Scott, and I were impressed by the attention to detail at every turn, starting with the reservation process. When is the last time you were asked if you had any special dietary needs or restrictions when you called for restaurant reservations? Not only was the person answering the phone not ruffled by our request for a meal free of animal products, he said it was no problem. Patti had told us her restaurant was vegan friendly, but we have been told that before, only to find later that the people in the kitchen didn’t really understand what it meant. Patti not only contacted me to make sure we had no food allergies or restrictions, but also helped us find the best route to her restaurant by way of the East Side ferry.  We boarded the ferry at Pier 11 in the Wall Street area and got off at the North Williamsburg stop and were in the Delaware and Hudson neighborhood after only a 5-10 min walk, literally straight from the pier down N 5th St. The ferry ride afforded us fantastic views of the city, the Hudson River, and the Brooklyn Bridge. We were also fortunate to have a picture perfect day with glorious weather on our side.

When we arrived at Delaware and Hudson after some browsing and shopping in the block around the restaurant, we were greeted by a friendly young man and decided to have a beer before dinner in the tavern. The bar was made from gorgeous reclaimed wood with the original distressed painted finish left in place. Patti even took a few minutes to catch up with us before dinner. If you think you can’t afford a drink in NY or that you can only get expensive pretentious drafts, think again! Delaware and Hudson has fine beers on the menu but for down home folks from NEPA who love local drafts that won’t break your pocketbook, she offers Yuengling lager and even Genesee Cream Ale!

Now, to attempt to describe the food which was like a dream, an out of body experience even, that left us looking forward to coming back for more…

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The first thing that came to the table was Patti’s famous pretzel rolls. She was worried we wouldn’t enjoy the vegan version without the butter and milk. My husband was head over heels for this crisp roll with a soft chewy center, remarking that it was the best thing he had ever eaten! Right after the rolls, came this beautiful tomato and melon salad which was refreshing and delicious. We thought the tiny green slices were green tomatoes but their mild tartness stumped us. It turns out they were Mexican sour gherkins that look like baby watermelons before slicing!

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Next were fried zucchini blossoms with a basil pesto. My husband enjoyed them and the presentation was beautiful. Patti  did a great job of minimizing the oil in all of the other dishes, but I’m not sure how one could make these blossoms without oil unless you had an air fryer.

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Next up was a warm bean salad with red peppers that had just the right blend of sweet and spicy. This was not your mother’s traditional three bean salad but had enough of the traditional flavor to make you feel right at home.

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This beautiful plate was pickled perfection with a burst of creative genius! Along with the crispest pickles I have ever eaten, there were fresh beets and ramps. I had never eaten ramps and the ramps were mild and sweet and a like “a party on the taste buds” according to my husband. If you look closely, you will see some dimpled tan gems on the plate. These were green Tristar strawberries. Patti chose them for the crunchiness afforded by the little seeds. Brilliant!

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This pretty plate of bruschetta was a taste explosion of mushrooms on a delicious and crisp bread with fresh micro greens. Incredible!

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Many local Italian restaurants in Northeast PA serve a pasta course, but I have never had gnocchi like this! They were like pillows from heaven with a balanced but striking basil flavor  with cherry tomatoes that were ripened perfectly, and topped with edible blossoms that added amazing flavor and texture to the dish and were a delight to the eye! Patti’s experience with pasta was evident on this plate.

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Just when we thought we were nearing the finish line, this incredible bowl arrived before us. This was the creamiest polenta with the freshest and most flavorful tomatoes and zucchini, topped with the mildest broccoli rabe we have ever eaten with no hint of harshness or bitter aftertaste. It was as if Patti had reached into my soul and made all of my favorite things in one dish. My husband also loved it and I kept thinking that if I told him I was making this dish at home, he would probably be wishing we had Chinese take out. It shows what an educated and experienced chef can do with the simplest, yet most incredible ingredients to make a show stopping dish!

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When this dish arrived, my husband was envisioning chef Patti in the berry field, choosing each lovely small, sweet berry with her own hands. Her attention to detail gives you the feeling of love and care for each ingredient and for the people who will be nourished by her food. When you have excellent ingredients, you don’t need fancy embellishments. The food is the main event.

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We had no expectation of any vegan sweets and would have been satisfied with the gorgeous berries we had just eaten, and then this floated onto our table! Chocolate with pink peppercorns and sea salt, popped sorghum, and strawberry gel candy. These small bites were a perfect ending to a perfect evening and we can’t wait to go back and bring our kids and their partners! We also hope more of our classmates will take the easy two hour drive to Brooklyn to have this experience and share it with us. Patti has something for everyone! We cannot express how grateful we were for how special our meal was and how she accommodated our lifestyle.

You can follow chef Patti on Instagram @delawareandhudson and on Facebook, too!

Remember to have fun with your food and enjoy!


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Can we be overweight and healthy?

This is a touchy subject but I’m going to dive in. I often hear people say, “You can be healthy and overweight.” By the same token, I have taken care of many thin folks over the years with end stage heart disease and other lifestyle related chronic illness, so it appears it may not be all about our weight. This is on my mind since I read this passage in Dr Michael Greger’s book, How Not to Die:

“Because those eating high-fat diets are absorbing so much fat into their bloodstreams from their digestive tract, the level of free fat in their blood is as high as someone who’s grossly obese. Similarly, being obese can be like gorging on bacon or butter all day even if you are actually eating healthfully. That’s because an obese person’s body may be constantly spilling fat into the bloodstream, regardless of what goes into the mouth. No matter what the source of fat in your blood, as fat levels rise, your ability to clear sugar from the blood drops due to insulin resistance–the cause of type 2 diabetes.”

I found this fascinating and came across an article from Harvard University that talks about the concept of the metabolically healthy obese, however, it does note the condition is uncommon and that we can’t discount the risks of joint damage, Sleep apnea and the risk for several cancers that come with obesity even in those who may meet the criteria for being metabolically healthy and obese.

The easiest way I know to lose weight and reduce your risk for chronic illness that is sustainable, delicious, and fun is a plant-based lifestyle!

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Remember to have fun with your food and enjoy!